Types of Concrete

Concrete comes in all shapes, sizes, colors, and forms.

The use of concrete has gone beyond the classic footer and gray garage floor. Homeowners can choose poured concrete basement walls; colored, exposed, stamped sidewalks, porches and if you find the right contractor, kitchen counter tops.

Colored Exposed Aggregate Concrete

Colored Exposed Aggregate Concrete

Add a bag or more to the concrete and create a variety of colors. A green patio will blend in with the landscape; a brown porch can be stamped to look like boards, the options are limitless. For top performance and value in commercial building under all types of challenging conditions, you can’t beat concrete. Concrete buildings resist fire, withstand the high winds of tornadoes and hurricanes, and take earthquakes in stride, providing maximum safety, security and comfort for the people in them. Concrete buildings will use Tilt-Up Concrete and Insulating Concrete Forms or ICFs.

Flowable Fill concrete is a versatile “liquid soil” which is placed as a flowable liquid, yet hardens and rapidly develops excellent load-bearing properties with no compaction necessary.

Pervious Concrete pavement is a unique and effective means to address important environmental issues and support green, sustainable growth. By capturing stormwater and allowing it to seep into the ground, porous concrete is instrumental in recharging groundwater, reducing stormwater runoff, and meeting U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) stormwater regulations. In fact, the use of pervious concrete is among the Best Management Practices (BMPs) recommended by the EPA—and by other agencies and geotechnical engineers across the country—for the management of stormwater runoff on a regional and local basis. This pavement technology creates more efficient land use by eliminating the need for retention ponds, swales, and other stormwater management devices. In doing so, pervious concrete has the ability to lower overall project costs on a first-cost basis. For further information on these topics visit the National Ready Mixed Concrete Association.